Meet
Richard Kane

Richard Kane provides data-driven analysis and economic insights for clients across multiple sectors.

He applies his background in payment and delivery system reform, microsimulation modeling, and economic forecasting to help clients understand new policies and respond to emerging trends. Richard brings to Avalere in-depth experience advising high-level policymakers on risk-based payment models in Medicare, including Accountable Care Organizations and bundled payments, and in building models that illuminate key concerns for policymakers on a wide range of health policy issues.

Prior to joining Avalere, Richard was a senior health economist for the White House Office of Management and Budget, leading economic analysis and modeling across all areas of health policy. Prior to that, as a senior economist for the Bureau of Economic Analysis, U.S. Department of Commerce, he led research, developed methods, and oversaw implementation of projects to improve macroeconomic measures.

Richard has a MIPP from The Johns Hopkins University, an MA in economics from The George Washington University, and a BA from Washington College. He is a London School of Economics Hansard Scholar.

Authored Content


Avalere analysis finds that most of the payment reductions from the proposed International Pricing Index Model for Part B drugs would affect oncologists, rheumatologists, and ophthalmologists.

New research from Avalere finds that Medicare patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may face higher out-of-pocket costs under a proposal to move Medicare Part B drugs into Part D, absent additional policy change to lower cost sharing in the Part D program.

Clinicians who treat certain types of cancer may be better positioned to earn performance-based payments under the Oncology Care Model.

More than 25% of patients with breast and lung cancers have been treated by a participating Oncology Care Model doctor. Participation trends could accelerate the transformation of treatment for some cancers, according to Avalere experts.

Moving certain Part B drugs to Part D, a proposal being evaluated by the Trump administration, would have disparate financial impacts on patients.

Moving certain Part B drugs to Part D, a proposal being evaluated by the Trump administration, would have disparate financial impacts on patients.

Patient out-of-pocket costs continue to grow despite policies to increase affordability for beneficiaries.

New analysis from Avalere finds that payments to certain physician specialists could increase or decrease by as much as 16% for their 2018 performance under the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS).

Avalere has updated its previous analysis to reflect the September 25 version of the Graham-Cassidy-Heller-Johnson (GCHJ) bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

New analysis from Avalere finds that the Graham-Cassidy-Heller-Johnson (GCHJ) bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) would lead to a substantial reduction in federal Medicaid funding to states of $713B through 2026 and more than $3.5T over a 20-year period if block grant funding is not reauthorized (Figure 1).