Meet
Chris Sloan

Chris Sloan provides strategic and analytic support to pharmaceutical, health plan, and provider clients on federal and state policy issues.

He has particular expertise in the policy areas around insurance exchanges, drug pricing, and benefit design. Additionally, he specializes in specific therapeutic areas, including multiple sclerosis, hepatitis C, and HIV/AIDS.

Prior to joining Avalere, Chris worked as a media intern at Mary Washington Healthcare, a healthcare provider network.

Chris has a BBA in economics and marketing from The College of William and Mary.

Authored Content


New analysis from Avalere finds that over 95% of counties with exchanges operated by HealthCare.gov have free plan options for low-income consumers.

Narrow network plans comprise nearly three-quarters of the exchange market.

Tune in to the last episode of our mid-term elections series to hear Avalere experts Chris Sloan and Elizabeth Carpenter discuss potential implications on health policy.

Tune in for episode 2 of our mid-term elections podcast. Avalere experts, Chris Sloan and Tiernan Meyer, discuss potential state and federal-level scenarios for Medicaid expansion.

Tune in to hear the first episode in our 3-part series covering the mid-term elections and potential implications on health policy. Avalere expert, Chris Sloan, discusses potential implications of the mid-term elections on health policy. To kick off the series Avalere Founder, Dan Mendelson, covers pre-existing conditions.

New analysis from Avalere finds that 2.7 million individuals from states that have not expanded Medicaid could gain Medicaid coverage should their newly elected governors decide to expand the program or states pass expansion referenda on their ballots.

New analysis from Avalere finds that 102 million individuals, not enrolled in major public programs like Medicaid or Medicare, have a pre-existing medical condition and could therefore face higher premiums or significant out-of-pocket costs if the ACA’s pre-existing condition protections were repealed.

With the 2018 mid-term elections weeks away, polls show healthcare is a top issue on the minds of voters.

Average premiums projected to grow 3.1% heading into next year.

New analysis from Avalere finds that the proposed rule on association health plans (AHPs) is projected to lead to 3.2M enrollees shifting out of the Affordable Care Act's (ACA) individual and small group markets into AHPs by 2022.

At 100% of the OEP, we are at 96% of total Healthcare.gov enrollment compared to 2017 (8.8M n 2018 compared to 9.2M in 2017).

New analysis by Avalere examines the impact of two market stabilization proposals-funding the cost-sharing reductions (CSRs) and implementing a federal reinsurance program-on individual market premiums and enrollment.

Deductibles remain high, nearing $4,000 on average for silver plans.

If federal government permits states to expand Medicaid to only 100% of poverty, nearly 4M people could shift from Medicaid to exchanges, and 7M could be newly eligible for coverage.

New analysis from Avalere finds that nearly 98% of counties with exchanges operated by HealthCare.gov will have free bronze plan options for low-income consumers aged 50 earning 150% of poverty or less ($18,090 for an individual or $36,900 for a family of four).

Avalere experts preview the 2018 ACA open enrollment season

New analysis from Avalere finds that the 2018 exchange market will see silver premiums rise by an average of 34%. According to Avalere's analysis of filings from Healthcare.gov states, exchange premiums for the most popular type of exchange plan (silver) will be 34% higher, on average, compared to last year.

New analysis from Avalere finds that the administration's decision last week to end federal funding for the cost-sharing reduction (CSR) payments could lead to substantial losses for health plans-ranging from -$1.2M in North Dakota to -$200M in Florida through the end of 2017 (Figure 1).

Avalere has updated its previous analysis to reflect the September 25 version of the Graham-Cassidy-Heller-Johnson (GCHJ) bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

New analysis from Avalere finds that the Graham-Cassidy-Heller-Johnson (GCHJ) bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) would lead to a substantial reduction in federal Medicaid funding to states of $713B through 2026 and more than $3.5T over a 20-year period if block grant funding is not reauthorized (Figure 1).

New analysis from Avalere finds that the Graham-Cassidy-Heller-Johnson (GCHJ) bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) would lead to a reduction in federal funding to states by $215B through 2026 and more than $4T over a 20-year period (Table 1).

Market stabilization efforts could also lead to higher enrollment in exchanges.

Benefit designs do not vary widely based on insurer competition, except for deductibles that are lower in areas with three or more insurers.

Affordable Care Act-compliant plan market would see 39% higher premiums, while non–ACA-compliant plans would have much lower premiums

As the Senate prepares to begin debate on a revised version of the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA) next week, Avalere offers the following observations on select components of the legislation:

Today, the Medicare Trustees delivered to Congress their annual report on the financial operations and status of the program.

More than 40% of counties could see only one exchange plan in 2018, with risk that some counties may have no commercial options.

The elimination of cost-sharing reductions could lead to low-income individuals facing higher deductibles and maximum out-of-pockets.

Funding earmarked for high risk pools in the American Health Care Act will cover five percent of the total number of enrollees with pre-existing chronic conditions in the individual market today.

Today, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released its final rule for market stabilization of the health insurance exchanges, following the departure of some health plans from the marketplace for the upcoming plan year.

New research from Avalere finds that under the American Health Care Act (AHCA), large states as well as those states with fewer insurers offering plans in the individual and small group markets could receive the most money from the federal government to help stabilize their markets.

Low-income and older individuals would incur higher penalties for failing to purchase health insurance, compared to current individual mandate.

Today, the Trump administration released a proposed rule for market stabilization of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

Plans sold in exchange markets in 2017 feature higher premiums, growing consumer out-of-pocket costs, and more restricted access to providers and hospitals than in previous years, according to a new analysis from Avalere.

In addition to Donald Trump's presidential win earlier this week, Republicans also won big in the House and Senate.

As 2017 exchange open enrollment begins, Avalere examined marketplace changes in plan choice and premiums at the county level.

2017 exchanges struggle to address challenges with enrollment, risk management, and consumer choice.

A new analysis from Avalere finds that consumers with a range of common health conditions could reduce their spending between $8,800 and $90,020 by purchasing insurance through the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

While we can't make any promises as to whether or not Clinton or Trump will bring up healthcare in Sunday's town hall, the odds of it happening are looking better.

A new Avalere analysis finds that approximately 8 million Americans age 55 or over who are currently uninsured or have individual coverage purchased through the private market-inside and outside the exchange- could be eligible to buy-in to the Medicare program under a plan proposed by Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.

A new analysis from Avalere finds that individuals who enroll in exchange coverage during special enrollment periods (SEP) have higher costs and lower risk scores than open enrollment period (OEP) consumers.

In preparation for tonight's vice presidential debates, we thought that we'd take a look at both candidates' health policy positions in addition to Exchange and Part D data for Virginia and Indiana.

While we technically have a few weeks of summer left, we decided to take a look back at the stories that were catching people's attention based on our website hits.

Recently, Avalere worked with the Council for Affordable Health Coverage to examine enrollment trends for the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

Avalere experts predict that one-third of the country will have no exchange plan competition in 2017, leaving consumers with few options for coverage.

Prescription drugs are not outsized contributors to rate increases.



As we near the July conventions and the November election, the dialogue continues to ramp up on the latest policy proposals from the presumptive presidential nominees - Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

A new Avalere analysis finds that nearly 13 million Americans age 50 or over who are currently uninsured or have individual coverage purchased through the private market-inside and outside the exchange- could be eligible to buy-in to the Medicare program under a plan proposed by Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.

An analysis from Avalere shows that more health insurance plans offered through the Affordable Care Act exchanges are making some drugs used to treat complex diseases—such as HIV, cancer, and MS—more accessible to patients in 2016 than in the previous years. Specifically, plans were less likely to place all drugs in a class on the highest cost-sharing tier.

One third of those who enrolled in a health insurance plan on Healthcare.gov this year picked the same plan as last year, according to a new analysis from Avalere. In total, 3.2 million of the 9.6 million exchange shoppers in 2016 kept their previous plan.

President Obama released his budget for the 2017 fiscal year today. Avalere offers the following observations on the healthcare proposals:

Today, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced that 9.6 million individuals selected a health insurance plan on HealthCare.gov during the recent open enrollment season. Avalere estimates that 2016 year-end enrollment will slightly exceed the Obama administration's goal of enrolling 10 million people.

In an article published in The American Journal of Managed Care, Avalere's Caroline Pearson and Deirdre Parsons examine provider networks and benefit design for oncology care in health insurance exchanges.

As the government considers rules for 2017 insurance plans offered through exchanges, a new analysis by Avalere finds that proposed 2017 benefit designs could increase coverage of certain services and drugs, while lowering out-of-pocket costs for many consumers.