Meet
Katie Patton

Katie Patton researches federal and state health policy developments and supports Avalere’s 360 research series, which provides clients with analysis, insights, and educational resources related to emerging trends in healthcare.

She applies her background in public health to support a broad range of client projects.

Prior to joining Avalere full time, Katie was an intern, providing support to Avalere’s business intelligence products. Additionally, she has worked in various healthcare settings where she directly delivered patient care and served as a patient services coordinator.

Katie has a BS in public health from the University of Maryland, College Park.

Authored Content


With the US Supreme Court (SCOTUS) set to hear arguments starting November 10 in California v. Texas and the swearing in of Justice Amy Coney Barrett on October 26, questions remain regarding the future of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and its impact on laws passed in at least 18 states creating coverage protections for essential health benefits (EHB) and coverage of pre-existing conditions.

With the US Supreme Court set to hear arguments starting November 10 on California v. Texas, and Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination under consideration in the Senate, questions remain regarding the future of the law.

Affordable Care Act (ACA) exchanges have seen a significant uptick in enrollment, especially from those losing employer-sponsored coverage or who were previously uninsured. However, different approaches to special enrollment periods (SEPs) leave many with limited opportunities to enroll.

In response to the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, a majority of state legislatures have either suspended their ongoing legislative sessions or adjourned sine die, which marks the definitive end of a state’s session, earlier than originally scheduled.

The majority of 2020 state legislative sessions are either approaching crossover deadlines or adjournment. In 2019 and 2020, at least 15 states (CT, DE, FL, HI, IN, LA, MD, ME, NH, NJ, NM, NV, OR, VT, and WA) have enacted laws to create or study coverage protections against pre-existing condition exclusions or coverage of all essential health benefits (EHB) provided for in the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

While the majority of state legislative sessions have adjourned for 2019, at least 11 states (CT, FL, LA, IN, MD, ME, NH, NM, NV, VT, and WA) have enacted laws to create or study coverage protections against pre-existing condition exclusions and coverage of all essential health benefits (EHB) provided for in the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

While the Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) did not intend for proposed changes to Anti-Kickback Statute (AKS) regulations to impact commercial market drug negotiations, some state laws may indirectly lead to commercial market implications.

Healthcare spending is expected to represent 19.4% of US GDP in 2027.